A Dreamy Interest in how Children Develop

As one who has researched and worked with children for a while, I often took notes about the way people behaved and why they behaved the way they did. I volunteered a little bit with the Children’s club in 2014, and I’d also like to self-reflect a little on consciousness when I was but an infant.

So, to start this out, I’d like to introduce you to the idea that babies can probably talk in their minds before their hyoid bone is lowered. Because of that, I thought it pretty interesting when I read how Louis Sachar described how the substitute with the third ear attempted to hear what was coursing through the baby’s mind. Since the baby had no organised language, they could only think in terms of sensations, much like how my brother would. He can’t see or hear, but he can still form thoughts and ideas with his other senses. But since Sharon M. Draper said in Out of My Mind, you need thoughts to have words, and you need a voice to express those thoughts, obviously my brother’s only voice is his behaviour.
On a different note, wild cats can roar because their hyoid bone is flexible, but in domesticated cats, and some wild cats that cannot roar, they cannot alter the pitch of their purr. So, what if we deossified their hyoid bone? Would the cat be able to vary the pitch of their purr, and thus produce a little roar? What’s really interesting is how humans have learned to articulate vowels and consonants in four or more categories to form organised speech. I have a theory that the reason humans lack so much sensory stimulation compared to other animals is because of our energy is focused on thinking and self-reflecting. But animals, as far as we know, don’t do that, so their senses are heightened all the time to mate and survive. Louis Sachar explored this in a book called The CardTurner.
Also, if cats can articulate some vowel and consonant sounds, can they learn to organise them into some recognisable language? Probably, but they’re not smart enough. That’s why when I asked, why do humans have races but animals have breeds? Their answer was, because animals aren’t smart enough to have their own culture. Anyway, cats can already produce nasals, such as /m/, /n/, and /ŋ/ or /ñ/. They can also make unvoiced plosives such as /t/, /p/, /k/, and /tʃ/. Some languages call for aspiration or non-aspiration. They often come up short when it comes to the voice plosives, like /b/, /d/, /g/, and /dʒ/. The unvoiced fricatives would be /f/, /θ/, /ʃ/, and /s/. The voiced fricatives would be /ð/, /v/, /ʒ/, and /z/. We’re not done yet! There’s the approximant, which are things like /l/ and /r/. The R can be trilled using either the front or back of the tongue. Cats are notorious for hissing and spitting, which would make that the unvoiced fricative. So theoretically, a cat, or any animal meeting all physiological criteria can reasonably learn to speak. Perhaps using safe brain stimulation, they can develop more memory cells. Octopi have blue blood because of their iron, and they have shown to have pretty good intelligence.

So, going back to my theory about infant consciousness, why is it that I can only remember being in this body once? And why is it that I can only remember to as early as three or four years of age? As far as I know, out of the millions, billions, trillions, etc of births that occur each year from every possible organism you can imagine, why was my mind and soul assigned to this body during this era in a specific place? Could it be possible that I was something else before that, but I don’t remember because I was an animal not meant to remember complicated events? It’s a wonder how many reflexes all creatures have that we don’t even think about. For instance, this web article, which I like because it is consistant with one gender pronoun, although it is not preferred, says that babies have incredible survival instincts; we just dont’ remember them.
So, , a child may not have the necessary information to express their true feelings about what they really want. It’s common in many parent and child relationships. Neither the parent nor the child is able to establish a clear understanding for one another when one or both of them lack the vocabulary needed to express a certain emotion. That is exactly what happened in that book, so I highly recommend you read it, and look at the first scene when the protagonist in Out of My Mind is at the toy store, and again when she is trying to warn her mother towards the end. Baby signs have been invented, and, as pointed out in Raising Rylan, it ended up having an additional benefit since he was born with very little hearing.
Another thing I found fascinating was what would happen if we didn’t learn the things we took for granted. Here’s another example about my brother. Since he’s never learned any kind of abstract concept like time, how does he perceive time in his mind? What if we decided that we would teach our future children everything but a certain item? Let’s say that in a hypothetical situation, we had many groups ready to start raising children. One group focuses on eliminating colour, another group removes time, and another removes sound and music (which already exists in Deaf culture). How would these children act when someone outside their group exposed them to the concept they never learned growing up? I probably mentioned this when I was talking about how Jonas didn’t know what colour was in The Giver, by Lois Lowry.
So, if you have a child(ren), and you are at your wits end, I’d suggest that you find out when your child is misbehaving, what prompts them to misbehave, where they are doing this, why they are doing it, who is it that they are targetting, if applicable, and how to solve the issue once it has been found, possibly by redirecting the behaviour instead of spanking. As someone who has worked with a behaviour technician to develop a behaviour support plan for my brother, these things are very intriguing, especially since not a lot of people have experience working with deaf-blind individuals who do not communicate with words.
If a child is having problems at a strange place like a day care centre, perhaps it is the way that they are being treated, and maybe it is affecting their overall development by giving them false information that leads them to make assumptions. I think one of the best ways to intervene is to give the child something they enjoy doing, or provide extra stimulation for something they don’t like doing. For example, most children don’t like to do chores, yet they must grow up learning how to do them. This is called the Premak Principle. It simply states that you must do an unfavourable task first if you want to earn a favourable reward. I have found through my own experience that providing extra stimulation, such as listening to music or reading an audiobook can help surpass the time while doing those unfavourable tasks.
I’ve once thought of implementing a GPS system on bus routes that would be available on an iOS or Android app, or even a Windows phone app. It would work on the same principle that Uber and Lyft uses. Since today’s kids are attached to their MIDs, which I like to call the iWorld, I thought it would be great if they could get realtime updates of when their bus was coming and track its progress on a map. However, some opponents of this would say that if we did this, kids would depend on their phones rather than their own self-reliable resources and not learn responsibility. I mean, what if your phone died? So, maybe they should earn it first. Somebody in Colorado tried to lobby the state legislature to ban all smart devices for children under thirteen, but many people argued that it would pose many problems, especially for people with disabilities.

For many blind kids, where walking around is not permissible in a private daycare home, or even when visiting parent’s friends, one has to be stimulated in other ways because of the lack of sight. Based on my experience, I found that whenever I visited other blind people, the children there were treated as family instead of strangers, and they understood the need for extra stimulation that they could not otherwise obtain just by seeing. So as long as they behaved they were free to walk around and feel what was around them. When I was little, my mother used to take my brother and me to my paternal aunt’s house so she could work. Similarly, she always dragged me to her friend’s houses. Sometimes I’d stay in the car while she did whatever it was she needed to do. However, my aunt made me sit all day, every day, without anything to do. I couldn’t simply look around me and observe the action. I could’ve used the time to write in my diary, as my writing was exceptionally good in sixth grade because I’ve read a lot of classic literature during that time. However, I didn’t have a computer until a year later, and it was but a desktop. I didn’t get my first netbook until I was beyond old enough to stay at home alone, so it was already too late. If any of these apps were available at the time, like Aira, which tells people what’s happening around them through a trained agent, or Be My Eyes, which is solely based on volunteers, perhaps my life might have been more enriched.
Here’s an interesting experience I had when I was probably three or four years old. I am going to relate back to my theory about not being able to remember things. I remember living at a house that was a two-three storey building. I cannot remember which one it was. I remember exploring a vacuum cleaner, feeling a closet, and things like that. One day, I happened to be outside, and I climbed two fences that was out on the second deck. I was walking until I felt the floor disappear, and I plunged down-down-down. I do not remember feeling any pain when I landed with a thud, except for a big jolt on my bottom half, but I remember crying pretty hard until I was eventually found. Someone must have seen me fall off the side of the house. I probably fell asleep or fainted, because it all felt like I was in a dream or haze. It was a miracle I could not feel pain because I was so distant, not to mention it was a long fall, yet I am still able to recall almost everything that happened to me. It was as if I were on sedatives 24/7! So, what do babies really remember? Later, I will write a post about using drugs for various things, sleep-walking and other parasomnias. For example, in the case of Kennith Park, he grabbed a knife in a way that cut up his hands while he stabbed his mother-in-law to death. And yet, he couldn’t feel any pain. Similarly, in 2006, I fell asleep on the port side of my mother’s van. I don’t know how long it was, but I remember dreaming that I was going to my cockatiel’s cage and cooing to Sunday, and that he chirped softly as I cradled him. When I woke up, however, I found myself holding another bird that I had previously taken with me. My cousin and I used to travel together a lot, and we used to take my bird(s) with us. This bird pecked a lot harder than the other one did, so if Zoey bit me, I didn’t feel any pain. And once, in 2004, my brother bit me on the arm while I slept, but when I woke up, I had this sore spot that I didn’t know how it got there. So, my mother filled me in on the details. Since many drugs derive from plants as a form of chemical defence, I believe humans produce tiny amounts of these substances which can have similar effects. That is why we probably hallucinate if we are sleep-deprived, why taking melatonin and cheese makes us have strange dreams and more. In 2008, I remember falling asleep in the front seat of the van, but when I woke up, I heard myself arguing with my mother. When I fully came to, I immediately stopped. I don’t remember what it was I was arguing about, but she told me she was going to call my dad. It’s kind of like when you hear your alarm go off, and you imagine yourself pressing the button to stop it, but it still keeps ringing in your ears, and again you vainly try to stop it. That’s exactly what happened to me in 2010. Somebody asked me a question, but because I was seated at the bus shelter, and I was extremely tired, I heard myself answering them, but they kept asking me the question. So, I realised that I never answered them.
Anyhow, My mother told me a story about a time I was in Mexico when I was running down five steps. It is queer (I’m using the word in its literal form) how I figured it out because I never recall. What happened was that I ran, and fell over the first step. I stood up and tried again. On the second step, I also fell, and so for the third, and fourth. However, when I got to the fifth, I did not fall. I slowly put my right foot out and noticed that the ground changed and so I did not fall this time.
Now, here’s something else I learned. According to some hypotheses I’ve read, children who grow up listening to intricate forms of music stimulate deep parts of their brain, which helps improve their personality (emotions, cognition, and identity). At this point in time, most children go with the flow. It won’t be for a few more years when they will have enough schemas to think for themselves. I would take this moment to approach this situation in a rational and logical manner, and briefly set your emotions aside to allow you to think more clearly. Some children sometimes like to test the limits to see how much attention they can get, because that also provides a sort of stimulation as well, even if that might be a bad form of stimulation. It’s all based on the reward and pleasure centres in the brain. Some people with ADD or ADHD respond better to punishment and intimidation instead of reward. Others are the opposite. Being swamped with several projects, though, I can wholeheartedly understand the pressure being added to meet everyone’s expectations in very little time. I’m sure there are some ways one can do to lessen the workload. People seem to be too fast-pace nowadays, so we do not have time for any family get-together traditions. That needs to come back.

My First two Skydiving Adventures

Today, I am going to be sharing with you what might be one of the most exciting events in my whole life, and I hope that this will inspire you to follow in my stead. I will be comparing two of my greatest sky-diving adventures, and hopefully this will help you decide which one you like best.
I got to go on two tandem sky-dive jumps, and to prove them, I have two official certificates stating that I did my jumps with a certified instructor. No one can deny the fact that I did it! On Saturday, August ninth, 2014, I went to do my first sky-dive, and on Monday, September eighth, I went to do my second jump. I was not able to record my first experience, except for what happened on the ground because when the instructor put on my harness and tightens the straps, they patted my pockets to make sure I had nothing on my person. I told the instructor that I wanted to record myself in free fall, but he said that it was something I would not be able to get on tape because of the United States Parachuting Association’s policy, which stated that I could only carry stuff with me after my two hundredth jump. I was also not able to afford in buying a video package as well. On my second jump, however, I was a lot cleverer. I found a sneaky way to have my iPod touch recording while I was in free-fall, and no one knew I recorded everything until long after I had left. I was also able to have my instructor use a GoPro helmet camera to record everything on video. Most drop zones have either a hand-cam or third-person option, but since I wanted to record every possible moment along with my recording, I opted for the former. The classroom at the Sky-diving Sports and Adventures over in Estacada we used was quite small, kind of like the size of a waiting room or sitting room. The one in Molalla was a little bit bigger, and the whole building with the manifest area was quite spacious as well.
On the first day that would change my life forever, we left the park where the retreat was being held at around nine twenty-five pacific daylight time, and we drove up to the Sky-Diving Sports and Adventures in Eagle Creek, Oregon, which is owned by Ralf, chief pilot and owner of the business. I went with two other blind people, all of whom were first timers like myself. Still, I was really glad I had two months’ notice about what the experience would be like, even though there were a few differences which I will describe as I go through my experiences in order. In short, there were five of us in the car. Three blind people and one visually impaired staff member and our driver. We came to a stop in the gravel parking lot, then we climbed out and walked to a picnic table. The day was nice and clear, which was perfect for a jump with no wind, save for a cool breeze from the
North-North-East.
One of the employees came and told us that every year, there was someone who usually wanted to take a video, and they explained about how these videos were a way to record their experiences. Only one person opted to pay ninety-eight dollars for a video package while the rest of us just recorded it. I did bring my own pocket camera, and I asked one of the staffers if they could film me doing my landing, so in a way, I was partially filmed, although it would have been nicer if I had gotten everything.
After the staff person processed the payment for the person who wanted to take the video, he brought us an application for all of us to fill out. Each person was to fill out the forms one at a time, instead of at the same time, which meant that the process took nearly an hour, plus an additional ten to fifteen minutes for the person to read the waiver aloud. Since it was quite lengthy, we all had to listen in because he was only going to read it once. The next person got to fill out the form, and soon, it was my turn. The form asked for my name, age, date of birth, weight, address and other contact information, including emergency contact information.
This is where I knew the waivers were different. Here, they asked if I suffered from any medical ailments, and one of them was hearing loss or impairment. Over in Molalla, they did not ask me about any medical ailments or anything of that sort. I wonder why that was? I was afraid that if I said yes to the question regarding my hearing, it would prevent me from sky-diving, but they assured me that it was only meant as a way to let them know in advance so that I would be able to hear them, and they would be able to hear me. They also asked me if I was on any medications as well, and then I had to sign three different pages. I asked if it was possible for them to provide a copy of the waiver in a PDF form so they could send it out to prospective jumpers. They thought it to be an excellent idea, and they said that they would consider and look into it further.
The way the waivers were set up in Molalla, as I soon found out, was very different. Since Sky-Dive Oregon is a pretty busy place, they set up iPad stands in the middle of the waiting area so people could use SmartWaiver to fill out, check about forty different boxes, and sign the waver in a speedy and efficient manner. The bad news was that I was not informed about this, nor was my friend aware of it either. Had we known that they were going to use iPads, I would have asked them to reserve a space for me to use an iPad that was not enclosed in a tamper-proof case. The result was that I spent nearly half an hour just trying to get it to work, and after a lot of patience I finally managed to sign the waiver with Voiceover enabled within about an hour. Fortunately, it was getting very windy, so we had to reschedule. Normally this would have been unfortunate, but because of how long it took for me to figure out how to sign the waiver with the iPad, it was a good thing that I had plenty of time. To prevent future incidents like this, I am hoping to contact the manufacturer of these iPad stands and ask if they can build cases with key holes so they could press the home button with the crank of a key, or open a headphone compartment, etc. This is simply policy standard to prevent people from using apps that would be on the iPad and to make sure people can only use them to sign the waivers.
After all our applications were processed back in Estacada, our instructor came and talked to us, introducing himself individually. He informed us that he had worked with blind people from either the Oregon School for the blind, or from the Portland Commission for the Blind. He told us that he would be guiding us inside a small building which would be where he would teach us how we were to exit the aircraft, which was a Cessna-182, and how we were going to land. There, we would also put on our jump suits and wind breaker hats, which looked almost like a helmet, except that it was made entirely of leather.
Over at Sky-dive, I was given an envelope that I would hand to my instructor so he could get paid, and I was led to another room in the building. When I got there, I took a seat near a wall, and the instructor started talking to us immediately. According to the web site, it stated that only students who were jumping could attend the class, yet when I went with my friend, he could attend the class with me, even though they weren’t jumping. Maybe this was an exception. I would be putting my jump suit and harness in the loading area, which was further out on the other side of the complex. The aircraft I jumped out of was a Cessna-208.
Over in Eagle Creek, before he started the class, our instructor asked us if we all had any questions, which he would answer as he taught us what to do. I asked about the rodeo sky-dive, where a person flipped three times as they fell out of the plane, and they would be falling head-first. I also asked if there were several methods to get out of the aircraft, depending on what kind it was. He could not answer my question about how free fall was interpreted by the brain, so I was left to experience that on my own for me to describe. He told us that the amount of time we were going to free fall would vary on how much we weighed. Since I was the lightest, it would take me longer to reach the designated altitude where the main parachute would be deployed. On this particular drop zone, the altitude where we would be falling at was anywhere between ten thousand and eleven thousand feet, so our free fall would be between thirty to forty-five seconds. Our instructor told us that we would be falling for about a mile, and then we would parachute for about five to seven minutes for another mile.
Over at Sky-dive, the altitude that I would be jumping would be anywhere between thirteen to thirteen thousand five hundred feet, or eighteen thousand feet if I requested that option. I will also state here that either the weight of me and my instructor was more than I thought, or something else, but my fall was no more than thirty-six seconds from that altitude when they said that I would be falling for sixty seconds. To confirm this, I listened to the recording and timed my fall.
After our instructor answered all our questions back in Eagle Creek, he waited for another person to come back. Whilst waiting, he asked us if we had anything in our pockets or anything else that might fall out. I had no choice but to hand over my iPod to another staff member, who would hold it for me until I did my jump. I must have forgotten to mute my iPod’s Voiceover speech, for my instructor heard it talking, which is what prompted him to check my pockets. One of the guys was worried that his glass eyes would fall out, and I was concerned that my hearing aids would fall out as well. The instructor took the first person down to the creeper, which was basically a platform on wheels that is generally used to look at the underside of vehicles. When it was my turn, he led me to the low table, and I climbed up on it. He showed me the position we would be falling, and he told me to stay in that position so we would not end up falling head-first. When we left the aircraft, our left knee would be on the floor of the plane and our right foot would be on the platform outside of the plane. When we entered free fall, we would have to arch our head and back backwards as hard as we could, and if we needed help, he would put his left hand on our forehead to signal that we needed to keep going back. Likewise, our heels would be on his butt, and if he needed us to go further, he would put his right hand on our knee to tell us to keep it there. Then he demonstrated this by getting on top of me and showing me how to cross my arms over my chest which he called the safety position. You do this both when you leave the aircraft and when you land. After that, I went back to my chair, and then the next person went to the creeper, and soon, our instructor had us practise our landing position by having our feet out in front of us as far as we could hold them, with our knees bent at a twenty or thirty-degree angle. We did this while sitting in chairs.
Over at Sky-dive, the training was very similar, with the only difference being that we would be sitting down as if we were on a kerb, and we would simply lean forward and slide out of the plane. The other difference that I noticed was that my second instructor had me stretch out my arms during free fall when he tapped me three times on my right shoulder. I wonder why he had me do this, but my instructor did not have me do it on my first jump? It could have been the fact that I had more experience, or that the equipment they were using was slightly different. My friend was worried that I would lose my hearing aids, but I reassured them that I already did my first jump, so I knew what I was doing. As proof, I showed them how the wind breaker hid them out of sight.
When we got into our jump suits back in Eagle Creek, we got our wind breakers, and when I put them on, they completely covered my hearing aids so well that there would be no danger of them falling out. The instructor asked me if I had glass eyes, and I told him that I had real eyes, which was a good thing. The goggles were attached to a string on the back of our hats, and we were to put it over our eyes and tighten the elastic strap on either side to secure it. The instructor helped me with the chin strap because it seemed to be tangled. After we were all set, he got the order of the people in our group who were going to be jumping with him. I was the last one to jump, so I had to wait for nearly an hour and a half before I finally got moving. Before we got into our harnesses, however, our instructor took us outside to where the plane was anchored to the ground via ropes. He opened the door so that we could explore how we would get in and out of the plane. The door was set up in an interesting fashion. Imagine feeling the bottom side of the plane’s fuselage curving as it went down to the belly of the plane. Close to that was a place where a person could lock and unlock the door. They would pull on the crack that was underneath, then they would keep pulling the door towards them and then they would end up pushing it up, like the trunk of a car. This was because its hinges were located towards the top where the right wing was located. Almost all sky-dive planes are high-winged, because the carriage hangs below the wings. To get in, I had to put one of my feet on top of the platform that was located above the right rear wheel, and then I crawled onto the floor of the plane. The instructor told me that I would be seated behind the pilot’s seat. I ended up riding backwards both times. Then we got out of the plane and he led us back inside, where our instructor proceeded in putting us inside our harnesses. When I got mine on, I wanted to tie it up myself since I already had experience putting on three other harnesses in the last few days of the camp, but because sky-diving was essentially a vital and extreme sport, only the instructor was allowed to tie the harness for me. I think a person would have to be certified to handle their own harness.
Over at sky-dive Oregon, I learnt a few new things I never heard about before. For instance, I was told to never, ever, ever reach behind me while getting ready to jump, because if I pulled on the wrong handle, my instructor and I would be history. He also told us that he would ask us several times if we were ready, and if we said no, then we would not be refunded. Once I proceeded with the training, I was taken to the back of the classroom, and I was given the stuff to put on. The jump suit I put on was a lot different from the ones we used in Eagle Creek, and I had to take off my shoes to get them on. That was one thing I did not have to do on my first sky-dive. The place kind of felt as if I was indoors and outdoors at the same time; it was very strange. Since this was a bigger plane, and because jumping out of it would be easier, I was not required to use the plane to practise getting in and out. To confirm my suspicion, I asked my instructor if it was true that only the latter was allowed to handle the harness, and he answered me in the affirmative, and he said that I would have to take accelerated free-fall training to learn about handling my own harness. One thing I also learnt about from my instructor was how to stay calm when the reserve parachute was being deployed. He told us to always keep our hands in our safety position no matter what we felt, saw, heard, etc.
After everyone was set to jump back at Sky-dive Sports and Adventures, the first of the trio was led outside while the rest of us sat down in lounge chairs, still inside the waiting area to avoid excessive heat exposure. I dozed off for nearly an hour, and then I heard one of the staffers report that our first member was coming down. When they came back to the room after they landed, we all applauded and congratulated them and asked them how it went. Then the next member of our group went with the instructor. Both times, I thought I heard him say, ‘Do you want to jump? Do not answer right away. Think about it for a moment, because this is really important.’ That is when I asked him just to make sure I heard correctly if he always asked his clients if they were absolutely sure they wanted to jump, once before they got on the plane, once while they were on the plane, and once before they were about to leave the aircraft. The instructor would also tell them that they were not being pressured to jump, as it would be their choice. You see, the reason they would ask you is so they can give you your money back, or at least some of it. If you said ‘yes’ the first time, but then you said ‘no’ the second or third time, then you would not get your money back. I could not hear what he said, but it sounded like he only asked certain people. I will not go into detail about the waiting process, suffice it to say that a few of the employees handed us water or soda to drink while we waited.
Over at Sky-dive Oregon, there was no waiting, and I was able to do my jump immediately after the class, which lasted about twenty minutes, so it began half an hour before the actual time that the class was scheduled to start. I left the complex at around fifteen hundred something, and I walked over to the boarding area. There I was informed that we would wait for our plane, which would taxi to the space for us to get on, then I would climb a metal ladder that had about six rums. I could estimate that the plane was about three or so feet above the ground. The plane’s engine was still running as people started to get on it.
Back at Sky-dive Sports and Adventures, after the first person was out of the harness and jump suit and the second person left, we all headed out to eat. However, since I was soon to leave, I had to wait until after my jump to eat for two reasons. I could get nauseated, and if I threw up, it could blind the person going below me and this would be bad. Second, because I would not have time to finish my lunch. After we were outside for a few minutes, I started to feel light-headed, so I went inside, and the others followed me. I sat back down and dozed for another half hour. After a short while the second person came down, and then our instructor went to refresh himself, then he filled out a few things before he told me that we were all set. Everyone wished me good luck, and I took my instructor’s elbow and we walked down to the aircraft. I also got to feel his container, which was like a big backpack that weighed five pounds. I asked him what he meant by the fact that when we left the aeroplane, we would fall at a rate of a hundred seventy miles an hour, but that he would pull out a drogue parachute, which would slow us down to a hundred twenty miles an hour for Belly to Earth orientation. He said that because when we left the aircraft, we would experience higher than terminal velocity, which would put a lot of strain on both our bodies and on the parachute. It could eventually be lethal because travelling at one seventy would rip our main canopy to bits and cause us to faint due to the excessive amount of G’s, so the drogue and or pilot chutes would be deployed immediately upon exit. The pilot parachute would also aid the instructor in deploying the main parachute as well. The next thing I asked my instructor was what people did when they fell, because it is obvious that when we lose our balance on Earth, we would instinctively reach out our hands and arms to grab onto something. To inhibit this reaction, he told me to grab onto the straps of my harness as hard as I could while having my arms crossed. ‘This way,’ he said, ‘if you feel like you need to grab onto something, just hold on as tightly as you can and let me do the work.’ By that he meant that I should relax, because I would have a lot of adrenaline rushing through my system, though hopefully not a fatal dose, or one that would cause me to be paralysed. He assured me that he has not lost anybody yet.
Back at Sky-dive Oregon, I told my instructor about my first jump, and I also took note in his demeanour. From what I noticed, my first instructor was more of a no-nonsense person, which made sense because people who did extreme things always made sure to do everything right, and they would not like any irrelevancies. My second instructor was more easy-going, which is what I like best.
Over at Sky-dive Sports and Adventures, we did one last check in which we practised getting in and out of the plane, since the previous time we did it altogether, and therefore we did not have a lot of time for individualised practice. We went inside so he could show me where I would be sitting, which was on the floor of the plane with my legs crossed, and my instructor would be facing me, sort of sideways on the left wall of the plane. In other words, I was facing the tail of the plane, and the door was on the right side of the plane, which was to my left. We got out so that the pilot could climb in and fill out his logbook, and then he told us to climb back in. We had to wait for two more people who were diving solo, for I was the only one doing a tandem jump.
Over at Sky-dive Oregon, I could hear the plane approaching the boarding area, and it reminded me of a jet and a propeller plane combined in one. This is because the regular planes have an engine that drives the propeller through a piston, while the ones here use a fan that is driven by a turbine. As such, you have speeds going well over six thousand revolutions per minute. Once the plane was parked, I was taken over to the line. As I got closer, I could smell the fumes of the jet fuel, which, for some reason, reminded me of diesel. When I approached the ladder, I started feeling the wind from the propeller, and I told my guide of that fact, and she told me I was safe. The propeller, which was to my left, was spinning at fifty cycles per second, or three thousand revolutions per minute. The ladder was tilted at a forty-five-degree angle, so I went in as if I was crawling onto the plane. The door was located on the left side of the plane towards the back. When I went inside, I turned around until I was facing the door, and I was dragged towards the right side, where I saw a long bench that was parallel to the wall. It felt like one of those kneelers you find underneath church pews, and it was that high above the floor. I sat down in front of my instructor, and then he hooked me up to a set of seatbelts that were fitted onto my harness. I was also riding backwards. For the first time, I noticed how loose the top of my harness was, but I will get to that in a moment.
Back in Estacada, one of the skydivers asked me where I was from, and if I was excited to do my first jump. I told them that I was very pumped up, and I was hardly feeling nervous at all. I soon realised why it took so long for people to get up into the air. There was a lot of waiting once I got to the aircraft, so that they could make sure that everything was working properly. I asked what it was like to land in one of those things, and the pilot told me that I did not want to land in them, but that I should jump out of them instead. After we got seated, the pilot had a few words with the instructor and the other people inside, and then he shouted, ‘clear prop!’ This basically meant that he was warning everyone, such as sleeping vagrants and small children and their pets to step out of the plane’s propellers so that they would not get hit by them. One last thing I asked my instructor was how I would not be hitting the platform of the plane and the wheel as we dived out of the door. He said that he was going to call out, ‘ready, set, go!’ Then he would push off the step so hard that it would propel us into the air, and we would still be moving forward because of the plane’s momentum. This is called forward throw. He also showed me where I would be attached to his harness. It turns out that they can vary, but they are usually between three and five. In this case, there were four, although there could have been a rip cord, just in case I felt like my instructor was being unresponsive, although I am sure he had an automatic activation device to back us up. This would cause the reserve parachute to open right away. There were two hooks on the shoulders, and two more down by the waist.
After the pilot made sure no one was standing in front of the plane, he turned on the engine, and we started taxiing down the gravel pathway towards the runway. Once he had located and back taxied on the small airstrip to get as much space as possible, he turned around to line up with the runway. The sound of the plane’s engine sounded like I was inside one of those antique cars, or inside a motorboat. When he told us that we were clear for take-off, he throttled the engine up to two thousand revolutions per minute, and, because I was good with perfect pitch, I did some calculations in my head. The propeller blades made an audible sound as they sliced through the air, and this number was thirty cycles per second. I multiplied that by sixty and got the end-result. The pitch of the engine itself was around one hundred twenty-eight hertz. One thing I forgot to mention was that the Cessna-182 was equipped with air conditioning, which was immediately activated when the pilot turned on the engine. It felt strange riding backwards during the taxi and take-off, but it was lots of fun. It felt sort of like when I was taking off in one of those Boeing airliners, with the difference being that the engine sounded like a leaf blower and the amount of time needed to take off was a lot shorter. Since this was a small plane, it did not take as long to get into the air, which was about five to ten seconds. Flying in one of these was about the same as in a commercial jet. The only time I experienced a sensation of moving, albeit forward, backwards, or sideways was when there were bits of rough spots. I could also feel the wind rushing through a small crack near the pilot’s seat on my right. I assumed that this could have been an emergency exit, or it could have also been the pilot’s own door. One thing was for sure, these Cessna aircraft have been modified for easier jumping. This meant that everyone on board was required to wear a parachute. I should also mention that the inside smelt like it was recently filled with aeroplane fuel, which had the same smell of gasoline they use to fuel lawn mowers. It was rather hard to talk above the plane’s engine, so whenever I asked my instructor a question, I had to repeat myself, and if he had something to tell me, he would use hand signals if it were a number-based response, otherwise he would just speak right into my ear. He told me that we were going to let the first person get out first, and then it would be our turn. At around eight thousand feet, he would have me turn around towards the front of the plane, and then he would have me scoot towards him so that he could hook me up to his harness.
The climb itself took about fifteen to twenty minutes, and we were climbing at a very shallow angle, so I could not really feel it unless the pilot either dropped or ascended quickly. This number is measured in feet per minute, and the speed is usually in nautical miles. Also, the way we turned was quite interesting. Sometimes I would feel the plane tilt to one side and then straighten out again. We pretty much ascended in a spiral-like fashion. From the outer perspective, it was hard to know what the plane was doing because of the Doppler effect. After we got to the designated altitude, I had to equallise the pressure in my ears, and my instructor asked me if I could still breathe. I asked him if I could still breathe during free fall, and he assured me that it was not at all like going under water. He also told me that the air was still good up here.
Once everyone was settled comfortably on the two benches over in Molalla, which, by the way, were covered with a thin cushion, the pilot taxied down towards the runway, then he turned around to back-taxi. After that, my instructor told me that we were getting ready to take off. He also explained to me that he would unhook the seatbelt at around fifteen hundred feet, and he would start to attach the lower part of my harness. Once we got to eight thousand feet, he would finish attaching the upper part of my harness. The seatbelts were being used just in case we were to crash on the ground. Soon, the pilot opened the throttle, and we were off. The time it took for us to be airborne was a lot shorter than I had ever imagined, but it made sense because it was a very powerful aircraft, with its propeller spinning at six thousand three hundred revolutions per minute, or one hundred five Hertz. It sounded as if I were in a miniature Boeing seven forty-seven, along with the sound of one of those electric lawn mowers. The climb also took very little time, especially since we were going to a higher altitude than the one, I did in Eagle Creek. It took us about nine to ten minutes to get to the designated altitude.
At ten thousand feet over at Sky-diving Sports and Adventures, the pilot opened the door, something I wondered how that was done, and I felt the cold rush of the wind hitting me. I could hear the sound of the wind, which sounded as if I was in a car with the window opened. If you mix that with the sound of a leaf blower, you would get the same sound. Then I felt the plane jerk to the right, which was an indication that our first jumper had pushed off the platform and was now in free fall. The pilot closed the door, and then we went back to the other side of the drop zone, my instructor told me not to put my right foot forward until he told me to do so. After a few minutes of my kneeling down on the floor, my instructor pushed me forward towards the door, and then he told me to put my right foot forward just as the pilot opened the door. I started feeling the wind blowing across my face, and then my instructor had me locate the little platform. Once I had firmly planted my right foot on it, he made sure I felt where his foot was, which was to the right of my foot. Our left knees were still on the plane. We leaned forward so that we were now partially outside of the plane. By this time, I already had my hands across my chest, so there was nothing else for me to do except to listen for when he gave the signal that would tell me that we were ready. At this moment, I felt relaxed, a little apprehensive, but still very relaxed. This was because I fully trusted my instructor and I knew he has done it thousands of times already.
Halfway into the flight back in Molalla, my instructor asked me how I was doing, and if I was ready to jump. This was also when I asked him if the top of my harness was tight enough, because I could tell that it was loose. He told me not to worry, that it was tight, and I trusted him. Soon, I found out why. After he told me to lean back on his chest so he could attach me more easily, he told me to lean forward as hard as I could. That is when I realised that he had tightened the top part of my harness by finishing the attachment process. Once we reached thirteen thousand feet, the pilot decreased the plane’s engine speed, and then he opened the door. I was sitting behind a fellow skydiver, so I had plenty of time to explore the container that was atop his back. I started to feel how cold the wind was, and I could also hear the people as they left the aircraft. My instructor asked me one more time if I was ready to sky-dive, and I told him that I was. He started pushing me forward on the bench as the number of people grew less, and soon I was on the floor. My instructor told me to put both of my feet out in front of me, and soon my legs were out in the open, and he continued to push me forward until the rest of my legs were dangling off the side of the plane.
Back in Eagle Creek, my instructor called out ‘ready, set, go!’ He pushed us off the platform, and I felt myself roll forward slightly, then to the left, so that I was now on my left side. My instructor stabilised us, and then we were falling. The sensation of falling was not like the kind I was expecting. It is not like when we fall in a dream, because that sensation is usually a heavy sinking feeling. You would, however, get this heavy falling sensation if you fell from a stationary aircraft, such as a helicopter or a hot air balloon. The air resistance gave me a cushion, and it was also sort of a reference point that gave me a sense of weight and direction in space. This was how I knew that I was falling with my stomach down. When I screamed, a cheer-like shout of joy, I could hear it resonate inside my head, and then I said, ‘I love it! I really, really love it!’ It was a good thing I was wearing my wind breaker, because it muffled the sound quality of the rushing wind a great deal. Again, it sounded as if I were riding in a car, except for the engine’s sound. I could feel a stinging in my nose as I breathed in the air during the fall. Since I was falling so fast, and because I wore two layers of clothing, I could not focus on how cold the wind was. Also, it felt like I was travelling at fifty or sixty miles an hour, not a hundred twenty.
My instructor back at Sky-dive Oregon gave no warning. He simply pushed us forward until we slid out of the plane, and I was met with a second or two of feeling weightless as he kept leaning us forward. I could not remember the sensation of tilting forward, but all the sudden, I was on my stomach plummeting towards Earth. At first, I let go of my harness, but I quickly decided against it. Soon my instructor tapped me on the shoulder, and I put my arms out in front of me on either side. I decided to talk into the camera, but the wind was very loud, plus it was also hard to breathe during the fall, mainly because we were so high above the earth, so my voice was never recorded even though one could see my lips moving. Also, it appeared that I was recovering from a cold, so the thin air made my nose run, and it also made my right ear feel as if I had an itch inside. A few hours later, I was aware of some inflammation in my left ear, which subsided in a few days. One thing I definitely noticed was that I did not roll at all, but I knew when I was spinning left or right as we were falling.
I did not keep track of how much time had passed back at Sky-diving Sports and Adventures, although at one point I heard a snap, like a metal clasp being shut, and then I was whipped into a standing position. I felt myself bounce for a little bit, and then I felt weightless for a few seconds as the parachute started slowing us down to about seventeen miles an hour. It was important that the parachute deployed correctly, because if we suddenly slowed down to seventeen miles an hour, it could hurt us and or damage the equipment. Since I had my knees folded during the fall, the force of the parachute pulling us in an upright position was so strong I did not even feel my feet move downward. It was as if one second, I had my heels on my instructor’s butt, and the next second, I was standing on his feet.
We started talking, and I could hear the rustling of the sheets as the wind was blowing it along. I asked him if blind people could sky-dive solo, and he said that he met a few blind people who has done it with an audible altimeter and a two-way radio. I asked if there were ones that vibrated for people who were deaf-blind, and he said that there could be, but they were probably not approved by the United States yet. I forgot to ask him how blind people knew where to steer if they could not see. This could probably be from the instructors on the ground communicating to the person via walkie-talkie. At one point, I felt myself being tugged upward as if a spring was pulling me, and I soon realised this was because my instructor was pulling one part of the parachute so that it gave us a feeling of weightlessness. This allowed him to turn more easily rather than just spinning. Also, we had a great sensation of moving forward because the wind was pushing us back, and I could hear the low, quiet
rumble of the wind as it rushed past us. He also pulled on both wings to slow us down, which made us feel as if we were going up and then down. For a few minutes, he told me that it was okay for me to let go of my harness so I could experience what it was like to soar like an eagle. It was very exciting, knowing that I was not attached to anything except a huge pile of sheets which I felt when we landed.
Over at Sky-dive Oregon, I felt a slight jolt as the main canopy was activated. I immediately put my arms in the safety position, and then I said, ‘We did it!’ I asked my instructor a few times if I was allowed to steer the controls, but he either did not hear me or chose not to respond. He told me that he was going to loosen the two attachments down at the waist so it would be easier for him to manage the parachute’s controls. I leaned back to get a better feel for how the gliding sensation felt, and I also wanted to look up at the sky as I was being filmed.
Back in Eagle Creek, my instructor told me to put my hands in my safety position, and then he told me to put my feet out, just like we practised, and I asked him if we were going to land hard. He said that we were not, since we would be gliding forward and hitting the ground at the same time. I would be landing on my butt while he would be landing on his knees. After I felt the ground hit my butt, the small parachute collapsed, and for a few seconds, I thought it was the main parachute, but they told me that they were kidding. They let me feel the huge pile of nylon. ‘Aw, does that feel nice? That is what saved ya!’ That was one of the staff members of the park who told me.
At sky-dive Oregon, my instructor had me put my feet up in the landing position a few seconds after he deployed the main canopy for practice, and I must have thought we were getting ready to land, or he told me to relax. When he told me that we were going to land, I put out my feet and bent my knees, just like we practised. Since my instructor was very tall, the landing was very different. We came in nearly in a standing position, so as soon as I hit the ground, I could stand up right away, and I took off my gear. I exclaimed how funny the landing was, and, at the instructor’s request, I also gave him a thumbs up for the camera. Both my guide and the instructor were surprised that I did everything correctly. I guess they were expecting somebody to mess up or something, but no, I did everything right! He asked me if it was just as good as my last one, and I told him that there were just a few differences.
Back in Estacada, my instructor detached the two of us, and I quickly got out of my harness and jump suit, along with the goggles and hat. The staff person who had my camera told me that he was able to get it all on video. After I was out of my suit, I shook hands with my instructor, and I thanked him for everything. He told me that he could autograph my shirt once I bought it. One thing I should note, the way they processed the videos was a little bit more primitive, for they had to put it all on a DVD, which they would mail to you within seven days.
At sky-dive Oregon, my instructor shook my hand, and my guide took me back inside the loading area to take off my jump suit. Once I got out of it, I was taken back to the classroom where I met my instructor, who handed me my first jump certificate along with a bumper sticker, and he told me he would be back with an SD card for me to take home. My friend, whom I invited to come along with me on the trip, congratulated me on my second jump, and I promised him that I would tell him all about it.
My final thoughts on these experiences: Since I could not record myself on the first sky-dive, I was able to create a replicated version of what skydiving sounded like based on sounds that were already in existence. All I had to do was make sure those sounds match the ones I had in my memory, which was easy for me to do because of my perfect pitch. I had no trouble recording my second jump, and for that, I am very grateful.
The instructor never asked me if I really wanted to jump on my first sky-dive, and I told people about this fact. Some of my friends told me that he probably knew that I was extremely self-motivated to learn about skydiving. There were probably a certain number of people who do not want to learn about it. They simply want to get the experience. One person thought that maybe I did not hear the instructor when he asked me that question, but that sounded illogical because if I did not hear him, I would not have answered him, and this would have been a question that required a response, so he would have had to repeat himself until I understood him. Maybe the first instructor asked me a similar question, such as what my second instructor said, which might have been why I was not expecting the same question that I was told by my friend. Such things can be, do you want to sky-dive, or, are you ready to sky-dive? You get the gist.
The reason I was hardly nervous on both jumps was thanks to a meditation class taught by a former teacher and a friend of mine who was at the camp. He hosted a stress and anxiety-reduction mindfulness workshop four days before my first jump, and a month before my second. I learnt how to fully relax and calm my nerves by releasing oxytocin, slow down my heart and breathing rate, etc. Skydiving or going on a wild amusement ride can be moderately stressful, but it has shown to increase oxytocin, though. I meditated a lot, and the fact that I did it so many times was the reason I hardly felt nervous, and it allowed me to trust my instructors fully. Also, the fact that I knew exactly what to expect was a major contributing factor. This is because people fear the unknown when they have no idea what to expect, regardless of their motivation and will. All in all, I think this would be something I would be doing for quite a while, and I might start preparing to do high altitude low-opening jumps in the future.
When I showed people this transcript, many people told me that I had written it as if what happened to me happened yesterday, which led them to think I was able to remember everything so well. I told them that it all depended on several things. Since skydiving was something that I was extremely passionate about, it helped me relive the memory over and over, looking at every detail, the way you do when you watch a moving picture several times. Another thing that helped me was research. For example, I did not know what the instructor meant by a drogue parachute. When he said it, it sounded like he had said a robe parachute. I went on-line to look it up, but I did not find anything on the internet about it. One day, as I was reading about skydiving in general, I came across the same word, and I took note of its spelling. If I forgot something, reading about it on-line would cause those memories to come flooding back. Also, our brains can remember images more easily than words, even for blind people. I imagined feeling the plane’s texture, from the outside in, and this allowed me to remember the words the instructor and the other people said. Of course, there is a lot of speculation that blind people can remember words better than their sighted peers, but it is not always true. So, this is what allowed me to associate things more easily, and I recommend that people do this more often.
regarding the iPad issue I experienced, I went over to http://www.iPadenclosures.com/ to see what kind of kiosk cases they made. It really surprised me that they had something that was supposed to be accessible to everybody, but current measures or policies prevented them from making that accommodation, or at least, finding workarounds. I was thinking of having them buy several iPads and making room for quiet environments so that people who were blind and or hard-of-hearing would be able to hear and or use a Braille display along with Voiceover to read what was on the screen. I also recommended that they include an accessibility section on their web site to let other people know ahead of time with the information they would need before they got there to avoid scrambling at the last minute.
Many people who are afraid to jump are frightened by the idea and not by the experience itself. That is why it helps to know in advance what a person would be getting into, though I was told that some people do not want to know because it would ruin the surprise for them. Still, I am going to be sharing this to anyone who might be interested, and I hope you can share it with anyone you think might like this as well.

Potential Experiments, a wrap-up to this series.

Today, I learned that olfactory nerves are the only nerves in the central nervous system that can be regenerated. Could this be the reason why some people have anosmia, because their nerves didn’t regenerate? This is what a team of researchers used to allow a Polish man to walk again. In addition, I read that someone had been able to create a connection between the severed parts of the spinal cord using a stimulation device, and the paralysed person could wiggle their toes for the first time since their accident. A guy over in Italy, Sergio Canavero, has been working on a substance called polyephylene Glycol to reconnect the spinal cord in a head transplant.
I’ve been writing heavily in my diary for the last ten years, and at that time I wrote a lot about things that might help as a transgender person. In biohacking, there is a technique that people are working on that would allow the injection of serum that contains nanobots. They would attach themselves to cells, modifying the genes. The changes would occur gradually. Once the changes occur, you would use nanobots to model and customise your body. In the future, there would be a lot more taking over when racism peaks its height. You can also prepare serum by putting the blood into the centrifuge. Of course, serum can mean different thing. Authors use it creatively to mean a drug or potion with exaggerated effects.
I figured, since I have a lot of fat in my abdominal area, I could use that to create new fat tissue, which can be used to fill out other areas that need it the most, while at the same time slenderising the areas that would not need it. That would also require the thinning or dissolving of a lot of bone mineral layers and other tissue. And, if we were to do the brain transplant, it would have to fit the new person’s head. Same thing with the organs… if we made the body smaller, the organs would also have to grow smaller, as well. I am purely against things like cochlear implants, breast implants, metals and alloys, and ceramic prostheses since they are all artificial facsimiles of the real thing, although ceramic may come to being the closest biologically because of its minerals.
The following passages were written by a male friend of mine who is into endocrinology.

I was thinking about how hormones could psychologically make someone more attracted to a different gender, and so I tried to think of qualities that are common to females and not males which males would be attracted to. At first I thought of the ratio of fat to other body tissue, but I realised that it must not be set in stone, because some cultures think fat females are attractive, fat within reason anyway, and some think thin ones are. So I thought of what I am attracted to, which is voice quality, although it might not reflect the preferences of other males. Anyway, I was trying to think of what exactly would make me attracted to voices that have a certain high in pitch and resonance, because it seems strange that hormones could affect that. So I thought: maybe it only does that because those voices are different than my own, meaning at least what I think of as being more female-like, and less male-like. I also like shorter instead of taller females, within reason anyway, which I think reflects this as well.
Also, I was thinking that it would be good to do a study to see if a certain amount of pressure could cause growth plates to fuse and undergo senescence. I know that growth plates are at the ends of bones, but for the sake of explaining what I would like to study, imagine the growth plates being in the centre. The two things I would like to study are these. If, let us say you had a leg bone, I think and the thigh, the longest bone in the body. Imagine you had the bone on a table, facing vertically so it was really tall from the table to the sky. I would like to put plates on either end and squeeze them together for the first experiment, and pull them apart, maybe with clamps or something for the second. The problem for the second experiment is that the growth plates are at the ends, so the clamps might grab the plates themselves and damage them. I have heard two different explanations as to why growth plates fuse and undergo senescence. The first is that they have a certain growth potential they can reach which is their maximum, and then they stop growing. The second is that oestrogen causes them to undergo senescence, which is part of the reason females stop growing earlier, or that they are generally shorter. The enzyme aromatase converts testosterone into oestrogen, which is why the growth plates of males fuse eventually as well. I do not know if it is proven or not, but I heard that males can take aromatase inhibitors while they go through puberty to only produce testosterone and not oestrogen, so it will take longer for the growth plates to fuse. It is probably useless once they have fused, though, unless, as I had said, we can figure out how to manipulate bone structures.

Cartilage still grows even after growth plates fuse, so that could probably help. Some parents have opted to use high oestrogen doses to keep their severely disabled kids from growing up, so they would be more easy to take care of as they aged. Therefore, it proves that oestrogen, at least, is responsible for sunting growth. This practice has been around for quite some time, and it is called growth attenuation therapy. It has parked a lot of controversy among disability rights advocates, though.
What do you think makes up some of your or my attractiveness? Some people on a FaceBook group I were in were asked, tell us about your most sexy attributes you are complimented on. Many of the cisgender guys said that their hair, deep radio voices, broad shoulders, and maybe penis length made up some of their good-looking attributes. Many of the cisgender females said that they were complimented on how short they were, how small or narrow their hands, wrists, ankles, or feet were, how narrow their waists were, or how big their butts and or breasts were, as well. So,I was thinking, why should we take the high road if there is something about us we don’t like about ourselves. People always tell you that you should accept your body the way it is, and live with it by finding the beauty in everything. Whether or not that’s a popular opinion, my view is different. I say, you should do everything within reason to change it as long as you can demonstrate that there is scientific evidence to prove your claims. You have the right to look the way you want to look, not the way your body, or anybody, says it should look. For example, a lot of trans-guys struggle with having smaller bone structures, and if they take testosterone before the senescence of growth plate and other mechanisms of bone metabolism, bones can be made to continue growing. This is because testosterone makes someone more muscular, although it has some growth inhibiting properties. Human growth hormones are what make people grow. Oestrogen is another growth inhibitor, but it doesn’t make one muscular. Aromatase, an enzyme, can convert too much testosterone into oestrogen… So, what I want to know is, why are humans meant to grow in one direction,, but not shrink in the other direction? Are there any animals in the animalia quingdom capable of shrinking? I’ve seen how trees grow through growth rings. Some people might shrink as they age, but I heard that this is related to the spine. Testosterone can make your voice box lengthen, and the vocal folds to thicken, which ultimately deepens it, but with our current medical resources, nothing can make it shrink back to its previous size. This is the same thing for bones. So, I met another trans-guy, and we were talking about bio-engineering, and some options came up. Now, I’m a big fan of nuclear and radiological imaging, within reason anyway, since I don’t want to expose the body to massive amounts of ionising radiation. I’m also big on 3D scanning and printing, as well as lifecasting. Why can’t we inject somebody, or two volunteers to compare and contrast, and then we can study, in fine details, how these bones are laid out, and what kind of planned action we can do to optimise growth or shrinkage of these structures to reach a desired outcome. We know that the human body replaces itself every seven or ten years. That part is widely debated. Everything except within the central and cranial nervous system is constantly being replaced with new material. This is because most birds and some reptiles have epidermal stem cells that mammals don’t have. The only exception to this is the nerves in the olfactory region. If they didn’t regenerate, we’d lose our sense of smell. This dividing and replacement of cells is called mitosis. It is a controlled mechanism of replacing dead cells with new ones. It’s like when you go and stock shelves at a store. You see people picking out soda cans and other things from the outside, and then more would be pushed out from behind to replace the gaps. These are called layers. We know that bones can thicken in diameter by a mechanism that causes more layers to be built on the outside, and more layers to be dissolved on the inside, so as not to make them heavy. We also know that bone lengths are dependent on something called growth plates, which are fused by a mechanism caused by chemical messengers. The key here is to use the principle of tissue expansion. Or tissue replacement to either lengthen or shorten and or slenderise bones. We also know that bones are flexible and durable. If you use acid, like vinegar, it will become soft and spongy. If you put bones in a hot fire for a long period of time, it will become crumbly. I once performed an experiment where I took a chicken leg bone, and I used a giant hedge clipper to break it cleanly down the middle. What I saw was surprising. The thickness. Between the hole in the inside and the outside was about a quarter of an inch, or about 20 mm. I wondered why we couldn’t peg these bones in place without using metal materials simply by using new bones to pound them into place, then the bone peg would dissolve after it has been exposed to pressure for a while. The pieces could also be glued together with a morphogenic protein growth factor. We can also work on reversing the mechanism so that more layers of bones would dissolve on the outside, and more would be laid down on the inside. That, in turn, would make a cluster of bones like wrists, hands, ankles, or feet smaller or narrower. I’ve also talked about using a handpiece and or routing materials to round out square portions of bones as well. If you wanted to square out a rounded piece of bone, that has yet to be discovered, although I’d love to work in that area.
If you are squeamish about certain things, then don’t read on. If we are to build a fully-functioning reproductive system for trans-femme people, then adhering to these facts is a must. Some facts you DIDN’T learn in Health Class!
1. Vaginal discharge is normal. What’s normal about it? Well, so long as it looked, felt, and smelled healthy, I guess.
2. Wearing panty liners 24/7 is not necessary. Why not?
3. Vaginas are acidic enough to BLEACH fabric, hence the discoloration of underwear. I thought the pH of the internal lining was nearly the same as that of the skin’s surface.
4. Longer labias are more normal than smaller ones (but both are fine). People think you need to get rid of longer ones because of edited porn magazine photos.
5. Sperm CAN throw off your ph balance and also change the smell of your vagina. Well, if it’s like combining what pancake batter smells like in comparison with leavening dough that has been activated with yeast, then it’ll make a perfect freshener and tell everybody that you’ve had sex. In all seriousness, though, I wonder if any of this is pheromone-related?
6. It is not safe for vaginas to smell like sunshine and flowers so quit expecting it to. Damn, so many of today’s vagina owners, mostly female-identified, have been brainwashed by our society to think that a natural scent is bad and unattractive.
7. STOP douching and washing your vagina with bath & body works, and Victoria secret. That shit’s not healthy for the vagina yall. Right. Just leave it be and find something else to do. Perhaps it’s another attempt at trying to get them to use more of their products for lucrative gain.
8. The vagina cleans itself. Duh, what else is it supposed to do?
9. Having sex has no correlation of how “tight” your vagina is. I could’ve figured that out a long time ago.
10. Yeast infections are COMMON!!! Why wouldn’t it be?
11. The best thing you can do for your vagina is to leave it alone. ? That is, unless you’re pleasing yourself or being pleased, going to the bathroom, or giving birth.
12. If your vagina stinks or your discharge stinks and has a color then go see a gynaecologist. What is it generally supposed to smell like? Many say it has a fishy smell that can attract cats. This may be due to the breaking down of amines.
13. Let it breathe. As if had lungs? Wait, I suppose you mean let the area around it be exposed to the open.
14. The VAGINA is the narrow canal that runs INSIDE the body. NOT the whole genital area. Well, why do you suppose people don’t call it a vulva to refer to the whole genitalia, then? Precision and accuracy matters!
*Do not use soap in your vagina.* Right! Just a little side-note here to remind us.
15. Always urinate after sex to rinse the urinary tract of fluids that could be caught there and can cause UTIs. As if….
16. Drink water. Right, so you don’t faint upon arrival of Aunt Flow.
17. COTTON panties ladies. Wearing silk, satin and lace seven days a week will absolutely throw your Ph off. How so? Are those substances basic?
Don’t argue with me about this. Even if you say your mama put you in satin diapers and all you’ve ever worn is satin panties. If that’s true, YOUR PH IS OFF. I GUARANTEE it. Well, let me just get a talking lab quest and insert a probe to find out!
18. Stop sprinkling powder on your lady bits, stop IMMEDIATELY! Talcum causes cancer. This isn’t a hoax or a joke and I don’t care if your 97 year old great Aunt Myrtle has been using it twice a day, everyday. STOP IT! TODAY! Trust me. So, talcum causes cancer, eh? And, where’s your scientific evidence to prove that?
19. Also, the Vagina is a natural sperm killer, except when you’re ovulating with the exception of a very high ph level. (Still use protection people!) Right, abstinance is the best way not to get any sperm inside of you.
20. This is all correct and true. Ladies, stop letting boys who got sex ed from Pornhub tell you about YOUR vagina. Well, welll, and just who do you think the boys are? Obviously, boys can have periods, too, especially those who’ve previously been assigned female at birth.
Sorry…. couldn’t help being a little smart-alecky, but I just couldn’t resist. Regardless, a lot of it’s true and straight-up blunt. Not only would we have to change the person’s genitals and internal organs, but somehow change the glands, i.e. prostate to Skene’s, Cowper’s to Bartholin, etc. Also, don’t you suppose the reason trans-women must frequently dilate? It’s because their body doesn’t have a genetic code for a surgically-made opening, so it naturally sees it as a wound that needs to be healed. That’s another important reason why we need to start using biotechnological intervention as soon as possible.
I also want to use genetics to cure Progeria, a rare ageing disorder caused by special proteins. It could help us develop antigeria, the way some jellyfish have. We can also use chemicals that can alter fat cells so as to destroy them, or extract stem cells from them. We can speed up or slow down metabolism, which includes catabolism and anabolism. This way. Think about ectomorphs, mesomorph, and endomorph, or neotenic individuals. There’s also the possibility of brain transplantation and cryogenics, which is always an option for hibernation. At some point when I got older, I experienced a rapid weight-gain, with my cheeks puffing out and rings developing around my neck, and stretch marks forming almost all over my body. The worst part was being that I looked a lot older now, and that it was probably due to a combination of medicines I was on after something bad happened to me. It was as if I were on cortizone-related steroids, since they were messing with my thyroid gland. I was constantly hungry, and hence, I was equally worried about running out of food. My brain was in almost a constant fog.
And just a reminder, if you have had a negative experience with a transgender person because of how they looked, felt, or sounded, do not assume that all transgender people are like that. Some, like myself, will go to all lengths to look, feel, and sound passable as the desired gender.
Anyway, I will wrap up this series, so as to make room for more stuff.

From Transgender to Transhuman, part 4

I am one of those who hopes that transgender people, including those who are gender nonbinary, gender-nonconforming, intersex, etc, can undergo rigorous gene modification and stem cell transplants to completely resculpt their bodies… both their ins and outs. There’s an article called Total Gender Change. Again, most of this information pertains to those assigned male at birth and who have been through their assigned puberty, including the a second puberty.
I have done a lot of Google searches for make hands and feet smaller, but all of the searches came negative, so I decided to go a different route. So far, I learned two things which might be of help in finding a reverse mechanism. First of all, the bones in the human skeleton grow both in length and diameter. through several mechanisms controlled by chemical messengers, which are also controlled by genetics and epigenetics. Sometimes endocrine disruptors can affect bone development, as well. People use oestrogen and other things to attenuate growth in kids with severe disabilities. Bone length is increased when new tissue is added to the ends of long bones called growth plates. After a certain age, oestrogen, or any form of testosterone converted via aromatisation will inhibit bone growth by calcifying (ossifying) the growth plate. The same happens with cartilage. It is believed that hands and feet are usually wide for this reason. Figuring out how cartilage is calcified can have the means to cure things like Fibrodysplasia Ossificans Progressiva, osteogenesis imperfecta, and other bone-development and maintenance-related disorders. We can also use some of these inherited diseases to our advantage, like using the characteristics of FOP to recreate new bone tissue to replace broken bones by taking samples of a person’s soft connective tissue, or giving said person a new bone of a different size or shape for cosmetic purposes, like in facial feminisation therapy. Any form of cartilage, especially those in the throat, will ossify with age. That is why, if you have crooked teeth, it’s best to get braces early. That way, you won’t have to possibly deal with TMJ/D (tempromandibular Joint Disorder.) I can already feel some bossing immediately above my eyebrow, and I hate it. That is what I love about basic research. If you focus on the basic stuff, it will hopefully lead to serendipities and great discoveries for potential cures rather than if we spent a lot of time and energy on just one or two major diseases.
It appears that our palms and plants may have some kind of fat or muscle underneath, and we could use cool-sculpting to reshape them. The next step would be to actually make the bones smaller. I heard that ultrasonic therapy helps in lifting, toning, and tightening skin around certain areas, so this could help in removing the spaces around wrinkles caused by removal of something. I think this is called fat cavitation therapy.
The length of many bones, such as those in the hands and feet, are controlled by adding bone tissue to the ends close to where the joints are, so that the skeleton can move properly. This is probably why biological females are more prone to developing hypermobility because they tend to be more flexible. It might also suggest that biological males who may have been exposed to oestrogen through any number of means could develop hypermobility, as well. After puberty, these ends, which are primarily made of cartilage, begin to calcify or ossify. Obviously, the only way to get rid of these is to decalcify the ends and force the bones to shrink. Few people would attempt this, so maybe an alternative route would probably be a hand or foot transplant, possibly one from a donor, or one grown in the lab using various types of stem cells, or just regular cells such as macrophages in a bioprinter. I’ve thought of using a controlled form of atomic oxygen or a focused jet of apple cider vinegar to soften bone tissue, since they are acidic substances that are known for reacting with calcium.
Bone diameter, on the other hand, is controlled by a similar mechanism, and this is what I think could help if we had the means to do it. At some point during a child’s development, bone-making cells called osteoblasts would lay down new layers on the outside of the bones faster than normal while osteoclasts would chew up the layers inside the bone cavities more slowly. If we could do the reverse, we could have osteoclasts chew up the outer layers, but in order to prevent osteoporosis, we’d have to build new bone material inside the bone cavities to balance it out. The width of the bone, or its diameter is controlled by how many layers of mineral are added and destroyed. Bone is constantly being remodelled. During a child’s growth, their bones begin to increase in thickness as more layers are placed. But wait. If you put too much of it at once, the bones will become very heavy. So another set of cells chew up the layers inside the bone cavity where the marrow is so that the space would be bigger. I was thinking to do the reverse. The osteoclasts would get rid of the outer layer while the osteoblasts would lay down new mineral layers inside the bone to make it smaller, but stronger at the same time. If osteoclasts only dissolved the outer bone, that would result in osteoporosis. Bone is not static–it is constantly being remodelled. Usually, the rate at which bone minerals are laid and destroyed are balanced, but this can change under certain conditions. Bones are able to grow both in length and width, but there are complex mechanisms that make it happen. So, what if I could somehow reverse this mechanism to make bones smaller? Imagine a very small tubular lead pipe. Every day, you add one coating of lead that fuses with the current structure. You do this for one week. Notice that the thickness between the inside of the pipe and the outside is much bigger, and therefore, much heavier, so now you have to dissolve some layers of lead on the inside of the pipe to get close to the original thickness and mass. So, for another week you add a clating of a substance that would remove the amount of lead inside. The result is that you will now have a bigger pipe that might weigh more or about the same as before. So, all we have to do is reverse this process. Some parts of my body are small by comparison, such as my mouth, though this may have been due to a lot of orthodontic treatment growing up. So, that is something to consider when evaluating someone’s prior medical and cosmetic history. Total morphology proportion analysis.
For both of these modifications, a bone scan (like dexa or sintigraphy) may be performed along with a 3D-printed model for comparison of both the host (your own body) and the target (a volunteer whose hand or foot you’re trying to match), or even their whole body. Bone scans shouldn’t be that hard, especially since two types exist. One is where hand x-rays are used to determine a child’s bone age, and another one, mainly used to detect bone cancer or bone density scanning, can get a thorough look at the skeleton for future modifications. To use less sophisticated resources, use glasses and helmets to measure the person’s face and head. I believe that transgender people should seek natural and alternative routes to successfully transition and still gain aesthetic, functional and sensational benefit from these treatments.
Having big hands, feet, or just being big-boned in general can be a problem for anybody who identifies as female, causing lack of self-confidence and self-esteem. Fortunately, though, there are things being done about it, but probably not this minute. Since I am very interested in osteopathy and endocrinology, I frequently peruse over these materials regarding this stuff. The human hand is comprised of twenty-seven bones, and the human foot is made up of twenty-six bones. Take note that these parts have hundreds of muscles, tendons, ligaments, nerves and blood vessels, as well. I base most of what i write here from these findings, so please note that this is not based on professional thought.
Sometimes, people grow taller because they produce more human growth hormones or because they intentionally take them. Some people don’t produce enough, which makes them very short. Some people’s long bones, like the spine, can fuse faster than other parts, which can cause disproportionate results, like having a short stature and having big hands and feet, or vice versa. There are other conditions that are particularly common in those with spontaneous growth spurts, like scoliosis. Some of these can result in chronic pain.
I finally learned something about bone metabolism, which can help me a great deal, since bone remodelling occurs at various speeds depending on how old we are. Human bones have been successfully grown from a person’s fat, but that is not to say that it can also be grown from soft connective tissue, as well. Female upper arms tend to be longer than in males, plus they also have narrower ribcages. I thought of using medical imaging and nuclear medicine, which uses every diagnostic intervention to look at the person in full detail, including three-D. I would like to learn how the Dexa bone density scan works, so that I can possibly implement that in my novel I began writing.
Biological males tend to develop heavier boney eyebrows. The tips of the nasal bones tend to grow more in biological males than females, creating a larger, (longer or wider) nose. Female cheeks tend to be fuller and more rounded. Under the influence of estrogen, fat is deposited beneath the skin, acting as a cushion, and overall facial and body contours become softer. This is reversed by androgens. The jaw in males tends to grow wider and more deeply sculptured than in females, usually leaving the gum line unaffected. Biological females tend to have thicker, fleshier lips than males of the same size due to estrogen.
Robot surgeons might be able to use lasers to cut through bone, replacing traditional saws and drills. Bones have to be strong and flexible. They cannot be one or the other. Calcium is what makes it strong, while collagen is what makes it flexible. It is a good thing that bones are not hard all the way through. If they were, there would be a different story. Bone scanners are not like CAT scanners. They usually involve a giant camera that takes pictures of a tracer that is absorbed into bone structures by moving around an arm, sort of like a panoramic X-ray machine. This is better known as a dual Energy X-ray Absorbtiometry scan. Also, I don’t like the idea of using titanium plates, wires rods, screws, etc to reconnect bones. There must be another way. Using bone cement is okay, since it is composed of the same material and even has some growth factors.
I have been searching every day for a miracle for my condition. The only thing that is realistically possible today from my understanding is adjusting androgens and oestrogen levels and some fake patch work. How far advanced has medical science really gotten? Can they resculpt the entire skeleton and the skull (jaws and all) with a bone scan? Can they redefine the collar bones, pelvic and puvic bones? Develop the mammary glands to form real breasts (not necessarily to produce milk although that would be even better, but rather than use fake implants)? Alter the number of skin layers (collagen and elastin levels)? Not have such coarse skin? Firm and reduce the pore sizes of the skin with a vacuum? Tweaking the larynx and altering the resonating chambers? Muscle and fat sculpting with cryolipolysis, liposuction fat transfer and fat cavitation? And, why not an actual transplant of the female reproductive system, or a development of one rather than a fake vaginoplasty for people transitioning to female? Changing the size of the limbs? Changing the chromosomes? As far as skin texture is concerned, this article has some good information. As far as keeping bones from growing, there used to be a practice in China that was done a long time ago. It was known as foot-binding. And, check out this historical larynx transplant.
From what I understand most of them are not effectively possible because of risks with transplant rejection and whatnot, but I am not too sure. Whenever I get these feelings, I always think of things that give me solace. What causes people to have big or small bones, anyhow? It depends on how fast they reshape themselves, and how many layers build up, which determines the thickness. It seems like people must give up something if they want that thing more. Like, if a transwoman wanted smaller limbs, she would probably hate to lose mechanical strength. Bone remodelling is still a few stages away, but the alternative would be a brain transplantation. For some reason, it is speculated that only one body can be used for brain transplantations. This might be due to something I read in My Brain on Fire where they talked about how the brain is immunodifferent.
I hope this will renew your interest in pursuing this, as I know that having bones is an issue for me as well. I believe that a person should do as much as they feel they can do, and get support from those who feel the same, like joining a participatory medicine group. If something doesn’t seem practical, it’s only because there aren’t enough resources or because we don’t have the knowledge and understanding to work with. Money is the biggest barrier for inventions to be made. It’s easy for anyone to come up with an invention in science fiction, but to actually make it takes a lot of work. It doesn’t mean that it’s impossible, it just means that it can only be done if we all chip in. Dreams can become reality with enough willpower and effort. May you have good luck in your ventures!

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