The Musical Makeover

This post was originally written on Sunday, 18 August 2013.
This project was started to help blind and visually-impaired people to understand the art of makeup and other attire culturally associated with femininity using sound. We use a variety of computer technology and holophonic and holographic algorithms with the most advanced characteristics in the physics of sound and light to date and apply a relationship to science and emotion. One concept we examine is qualia, the state of overall conscience in a human being when exposed to the redness of twilight. Until the transhumanism community finds a way to stimulate the visual cortex, this is all that we currently have to help blind people understand how attractive they really look using sound. Put these in mind. Colour equals tones, and shades and tints are noise. There will be a whole lot more, and current sounds will only show you the patterns of light that will be converted. A completely different algorithm can take the shape of the image and turn it into a soundscape for a blind person to interpret. One question I would want to keep in mind is, how and why do male and female skin contrasts and other characteristics differ? Is it because of hormones, race, etc? Many people use the words ethnicity and race the same way they use the words sex and gender. The former can be compared to race while the latter can be related to ethnicity.
Before we begin, let us start out with the concepts and history of cosmetics. First of all, what is makeup? Makeup is a type of practice that involves the use of pigments that are applied to parts of the body to modify a wavelength of light reflection, apart from the skin’s natural colour, which ranges from dark to light types of ROY. Some of the other options in cosmetology such as hair styles, jewlry, etc may not need a lot of training such as makeup because blind people will be able to feel them. Hair dying is a different matter and may require some training with the Musical Makeover to understand this better.
What is the purpose of makeup and why has it existed? Makeup is a way of modifying a wavelength of light on the surface of the skin or other part of the body to enhance their attractivity to other members. It is like someone shows you a list of harmonic-based music, and you have to choose which one you found most attractive. Science has actually demonstrated that the use of makeup throughout history has aided in gaining more attraction. However, as things advanced, we invented chemicals with pigments in them that were easy to apply and could be put in a variety of different forms and shapes.
Here’s a textbook example of makeup and jewellry and other forms of maximum differentiation. I didn’t learn the real reason high heels were invented, but after doing a little bit of digging, I discovered that they lifted a person’s heels to make it look as though said person was having an orgasm. Likewise, makeup made one look as if someone were constantly flushing. I guess that’s why a lot of double-standards dictate that when a woman is aroused, she can get away with it because there is no visible external signs the way there would be if a man were aroused.
Now, you might be wondering, why do we use music? First of all, let me explain what music is. Music consiss of organised time and sound. But this is not the case with colours. Colour is a pattern of light (a set of frequencies) that can evoke specific emotions and moods. In sound, however, this changes slightly. While we have been able to transpose light frequencies directly to sound frequencies, musical keys of all sorts, including intervals have shown to evoke emotion rather than single-pitched notes such as in the rainbow piano technique. Suppose we could treat this art as we would colour. This means that the musical makeover would only consist of chords that move in random accordance to what was being displayed on the camera or mirror screen. In other words, no rhythm or organised stuff.
Now that you have learned about musical makeover, it is time for us to start spreading the word about this wonderful possibility to concentrate not only on the obvious, but start to see beyond expectations. Below are a list of sources that explain some of the work being done in this field.
Adam Montandon’s Official Website: http://www.adammontandon.com/neil-harbisson-the-cyborg/
Cyborg Foundation: http://www.cyborgfoundation.com/
Neil Harbisson – I listen to Colour: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ygRNoieAnzI
The Human Eyeborg : Neil Harbisson at Gateway: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=d_mmwrbDGac
Neil Harbisson – the Cyborg who hears Colour: http:/HYPERLINK “http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cO_P2EYnu7c”/www.youtube.com/watch?v=cO_P2EYnu7c
And finally, the Colour of Sound – Documentary, a video describing the strong links between the two overlapping senses using synaesthesia: http://www.youtubeHYPERLINK “http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cj4MOOCFspk”.com/watch?v=cj4MOOCFspk
Emotions of the musical keys by Christian Schubart: http://www.wmich.edu/mus-theo/courses/keys.htm
http://www.color-wheel-pro.com/coHYPERLINK “http://www.color-wheel-pro.com/color-meaning.html”lor-meaning.html
Please note: Everything stated in this entry always has exceptions, can be easily contradicted, and I may forget to add something important long after this post has been published. Please remember to let me know if any of these links are broken. In the next post I will cover some of the reasons I am opposed to popular culture such as music. Just to make things clear. I do my best not to let my work consume my life and to throw myself one hundred percent into anything that I am exposed to. Usually I might get so involved for the first few bits of the thing that I am working on before it starts to balance out and something new comes along. I do not fall under the typical blind stereotypes because I want to take in everything life has to offer.

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